Photographs, vintage postcards and other ephemera


Saturday, 12 May 2012

Kitchen essential

Sepia Saturday is in the kitchen this week. The image is one of the advertisements from Jackson's Handbook for Tourists in Yorkshire and Complete History of the County, published in Leeds by Richard Jackson in 1891.
I loved coal-fired kitchen ranges when I was a child. When I was five, my family moved from a 1930's town semi to a Victorian house in the country and I was delighted to find one like this in our kitchen. I remember being fascinated by all the little ovens and the shiny brass fittings including a long rail for hanging laundry to air. Mum, however, absolutely hated the range and it was ripped out and replaced with a modern tiled fireplace and an electric cooker. She always maintained that I cried when it went, but I suspect she was exaggerating....

Lots more images over at Sepia Saturday!

10 comments:

Alan Burnett said...

I can just remember my mother and my aunties talking about the old kitchen ranges that were such a feature of their own youth. They all welcomed the modern gas cookers that were proudly displayed in the Gas and Electricity Showrooms with open arms. I suppose the modern ranges such as Agas are now back in fashion, but I suspect my mothers generation would still have preferred their old (new) shiny cookers.

Wendy said...

I see why that range would be fascinating. I'm fascinated by it now -- all those little ovens. Having multiple ovens is still a good idea.

Bob Scotney said...

Our range in the 40s and 50s was similar to that in your picture. The fire rarely went out.

Little Nell said...

I sympathise with your Mum.Nostalgia makes us think that those ranges were so wonderful, when in relaity they were a lot of work for the cook.

Kristin said...

We had a wood/electric combo stove for some years in the 1980s. I liked it, especially in the winter when it warmed up the kitchen wonderfully. It was nothing like this fantastic, hugh range though!

Oregon Gifts of Comfort and Joy said...

I would have cried too! I love old stoves. It was fun to see the brochure and read your memories,

Kathy M.

barbara and nancy said...

How funny that you were sad when the range was replaced by the more modern version. I take it you weren't the one doing the cooking.
Nancy

barbara and nancy said...

It is a beautiful "cooking range" but I would hate to cook on it. (well, actually, I hate to cook on anything, so I'm not much of a judge.) I can imagine how your mother must have felt, though.
Barbara

Queen Bee said...

While this stove looks amazing, I can't imagine cooking on it. Bet the kitchen was sweltering during the summertime when the range was in use and warm and cozy during the winter months.

Tattered and Lost said...

I know what a locksmith is and I can figure out what a bell hanger is, though I've never really thought of it as a profession, but what is a Whitesmith?